Media Advisory: First New England-based Fast Response Cutter to arrive in Boston

Source: United States Coast Guard

News Release  

U.S. Coast Guard 1st District Northeast
Contact: 1st District Public Affairs
D1PublicAffairs@uscg.mil
1st District online newsroom

Media Advisory: First New England-based Fast Response Cutter to arrive in Boston

Editors note: Media interested in attending the ship’s arrival are requested to RSVP with d1publicaffairs@uscg.mil no later than 4 p.m. Wednesday.

 

BOSTON — Coast Guard Cutter William Chadwick (WPC-1150) is scheduled to arrive Thursday following a transit from Key West, Fla. The newly-built William Chadwick was accepted by the Coast Guard on August 4, and will be the first of six Fast Response Cutters homeported in Boston.

 

The cutter’s arrival will include a water salute from the Boston Fire Department and air escort by an Air Station Cape Cod, Mass., MH-60 Jayhawk crew. Crew families, and Coast Guard personnel will be providing a pier side welcoming party for their arrival.

 

WHO: Lt. Cmdr. Tyler Kelley, commanding officer of the William Chadwick, along with the ship’s crew.

WHAT: Arrival of USCGC William Chadwick to Boston

WHEN: Thursday September 29, 2022, at 1:00 p.m. Media are requested to arrive by 12:30 p.m. to clear security and be escorted to the pier

WHERE: Coast Guard Base Boston, 427 Commercial St., Boston, MA 02109

 

The Sentinel-class fast response cutter (FRC) is designed for multiple missions, including drug and migrant interdiction; ports, waterways and coastal security; fishery patrols; search and rescue; and national defense. The Coast Guard has ordered 65 FRCs to replace the 1980s-era Island-class 110-foot patrol boats. The FRCs feature advanced command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance equipment; over the horizon cutter boat deployment to reach vessels of interest; and improved habitability and seakeeping.

 

The ship’s commissioning ceremony will be held November 10, 2022 at Base Boston.

 

Born in Dover, New Jersey, the cutter’s namesake was a keeper of the Green Island Lifeboat Station in New Jersey and recipient of the Congressional Gold Lifesaving Medal for his rescue of the crew of the schooner George Taulane on Feb. 3, 1880. Chadwick remained keeper of Green Island Station until his retirement in August 1886.

 

-USCG-

NATO Secretary General convenes top Alliance procurement officials

Source: NATO

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg convened an extraordinary meeting of the Conference of National Armaments Directors (CNAD) on Tuesday (27 September 2022) at NATO Headquarters. The meeting focused on the implications of Russia’s war against Ukraine, including on Allies’ capabilities and munitions stockpiles.

The Secretary General urged Allies to continue replenishing stocks as rapidly as possible. “Enhancing NATO stockpiles will ensure we can keep supporting Ukraine,” he said. “We need to keep working together as NATO Allies and with industry to replenish our munitions stocks and provide Ukraine with the support it needs, for as long as Ukraine needs it,” he added. The meeting addressed ways in which Allies can better understand any gaps in stockpiles, and address such gaps together. 

The CNAD’s mission is to enable cooperation in the delivery of interoperable military capabilities. It ensures that NATO forces have state-of-the-art capabilities readily available at all times.

Air Force, Army air defenders demonstrate enhanced air, missile defense system

Source: United States Air Force

In the world of air and missile defense, the further away a possible threat can be accurately detected and rapidly identified, the more time decision makers will have to respond. 

With that in mind, Air Forces Northern teamed up with the 263rd Army Air and Missile Defense Command from Anderson, South Carolina, and the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Aviation and Missile Center from Huntsville, Alabama, to conduct a Deployable Integrated Air Defense System, or D-IADS, Technology Demonstration featuring enhanced capabilities, Sept. 12-23, at Tyndall Air Force Base. 

 “The D-IADS tech demo was an opportunity to get after multiple technical goals relevant to U.S. Continental NORAD Region’s homeland defense mission, to include combat identification, tactics development, and deployment of the complete D-IADS package,” said Maj. Zachary Darnell, First Air Force Strategic Programs Division chief. “Additionally, it provided a great opportunity to strengthen our partnership with Army air and missile defense partners.” 

The demonstration was conducted to validate the system’s deployment procedures and to validate an advanced electronic identification capability, known as Joint Multi-platform Advanced Combat, or JMAC, identification into NORAD’s D-IADS. JMAC is designed to increase battlespace awareness by enhancing threat identification and therefore providing leaders more decision time. 

 
 
“We have a highly trained air and missile defense team. These enhanced capabilities are designed to gain additional air domain awareness while decreasing the time required to identify potential threats. This provides decision makers more time to employ various defensive response options,” said Lt. Gen. Kirk Pierce, commander of U.S. Continental NORAD Region, and commander of 1st Air Force (Air Forces Northern and Air Forces Space). “Time to make effective decisions is critical in air and missile defense. We’re confident the enhanced capabilities will enable D-IADS to do that.” 
 
Also supporting the tech demo were five Airmen from the Georgia Air National Guard’s 283rd Combat Communications Squadron located at Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Georgia. The 283rds mission is to provide deployable communications and information capabilities to deployed forces. 

The technical demonstration kicked off with a site visit to one of the Tyndall AFB radar locations by Pierce and Brig. Gen. Richard A. Wholey, 263rd AAMDC deputy commanding general, to view some of the equipment used for the demonstration. For the demonstration, the 263rd AAMDC provided two U.S. Army Improved Sentinel Radars, a National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile System, or NASAMS, launcher, and a command and control, or C2, mobile suite, along with approximately 70 support personnel. 

“Our mission partners in the 53rd Weapons Evaluation Group and 325th Fighter Wing played a key role in the success of this demonstration,” said Col. Michael Western, A5/8 Strategic Plans and Requirements director. “The WEG’s Weapon System Evaluation Program exercise was instrumental in providing realistic aerial threats.” 

According to Mike Nigro, 1AF Strategic Programs technical lead, the Sentinel radars, positioned at disparate locations on the expansive base, surveilled airspace and then identified a variety of simulated aerial threats representing enemy missiles and aircraft. The radars provided data to a C2 suite where air defenders were poised to employ countermeasures – in this case the NASAMS – to defeat the threat. 

The enhanced capabilities have a potential to integrate a variety of typically “stand-alone” sensors with various sensor modalities, not only in the U.S., but in partner commands overseas, according to Nigro. Data taken during the two-week demonstration will be assessed to determine the overall performance of D-IADS and the enhanced capabilities. 

Near-peer competitors continuously look to gain technological advantages while the Defense Department remains committed to advancing its capabilities to stay ahead of emerging threats, according to Nigro. 

“We take pride in our homeland defense efforts to protect our citizens and deter our adversaries,” Nigro said. 

D-IADS is no stranger to Tyndall AFB. The system was previously deployed to the base in 2017 for training.

MEDIA AVAILABILITY: Coast Guard prepares for Hurricane Ian along Florida coast

Source: United States Coast Guard

Coast Guard prepares for Hurricane Ian along Florida coast

Editors’ Note: Media interested in attending are requested to RSVP at 305-607-6347 or padettampabay@gmail.com by 10:00 a.m., Set. 27, 2022 and should arrive no later than 1:15 p.m.

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — The Coast Guard is making preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Ian along Florida’s gulf coast and for response to any related distress or storm damage.

WHO: Capt. Michael Kahle, Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Sector St. Petersburg 

WHAT: Coast Guard Hurricane Ian preparedness and mariners’ safety information 

WHEN: Tuesday, Sept. 27 at 1:30 p.m.

WHERE: Coast Guard Sector St. Petersburg, 600 8th Ave SE, St. Petersburg, FL 

The maritime community and boating public are strongly urged to track the storm’s progress and take early action to protect themselves and their vessels. Extremely high seas, heavy rains, and damaging winds that accompany tropical storms and hurricanes present serious dangers to mariners. Rescue and assistance by the Coast Guard and other agencies may be severely degraded or unavailable immediately before, during, and after a devastating storm.

Dangerous weather conditions generated by a hurricane can cover an area hundreds of miles wide. Even recreational boaters and the maritime industry who fall outside of the direct path of the storm are advised to be aware of dangerous weather conditions and take appropriate precautions to stay safe and minimize damage.

The Coast Guard is warning the public of these important safety messages:

· Stay off the water. The Coast Guard’s search and rescue capabilities degrade as storm conditions strengthen. This means help could be delayed. Boaters should heed weather watches, warnings, and small craft advisories.

· Evacuate as necessary. If mandatory evacuations are set for an area, the public should evacuate without delay. Coast Guard personnel and other emergency responders may not be able to evacuate or rescue those in danger during the storm.

· Secure belongings. Owners of large boats are urged to move their vessels to inland marinas where they will be less vulnerable to breaking free of their moorings or sustaining damage. Trailerable boats should be pulled from the water and stored in a place that is not prone to flooding. Those who are leaving their boats in the water are reminded to remove EPIRBs and to secure life rings, lifejackets, and small boats. These items, if not properly secured, can break free and require valuable search and rescue resources to be diverted to ensure people are not in distress. Similarly, watercraft such as jet skis, kayaks, canoes, paddle boards, and other similar craft should be stowed so they do not end up in the water.  

· Stay clear of beaches. Wave heights and currents typically increase before a storm makes landfall. Even the best swimmers can fall victim to the strong waves and rip currents caused by hurricanes. Swimmers should stay clear of beaches until local lifeguards and law enforcement officials say the water is safe.

· Be prepared. Area residents should be prepared by developing a family plan, creating a disaster supply kit, having a place to go, securing their home, and having a plan for pets. Information can be found on the National Hurricane Center’s webpage.

· Stay informed. The public should monitor the progress and strength of the storm through local television, radio, and the Internet. Boaters can monitor the storm’s progress on VHF radio channel 16. Information can also be obtained on small craft advisories and warnings on VHF radio channel 16.

For information on Hurricane Ian’s progress and hurricane preparedness, please visit the National Hurricane Center’s webpage.

For more breaking news follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

-USCG-

Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville sets Port Condition X-Ray for Port of Canaveral

Source: United States Coast Guard

News Release  

U.S. Coast Guard 7th District Southeast
Contact: 7th District Public Affairs
Office: 305-415-6683
After Hours: 786-367-7649
7th District online newsroom

Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville sets Port Condition X-Ray for Port of Canaveral

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — The Coast Guard Captain of the Port for Jacksonville (COTP) has set Port Condition X-Ray for the Port of Canaveral due to forecasted sustained Tropical Storm Force Winds of 39 mph and gusts up to 73 mph generated by Hurricane Ian that may arrive within 48 hours.

These ports and facilities are currently open to all commercial traffic, and all transfer operations may continue while the X-Ray remains in effect. 

Sustained winds between 39 and 54 mph are possible within 48 hours. Mariners are reminded there are no safe havens in these facilities, and ports are safest when the inventory of vessels is at a minimum. All ocean-going commercial vessels and ocean-going barges greater than 500 gross tonnage should make plans for departing the port.

Pleasure crafts are advised to seek safe harbor. Drawbridges may not be operating if sustained winds reach 25 mph or when an evacuation is in progress. Port facilities are advised to review their heavy weather plans and take all necessary precautions to adequately prepare for the expected conditions. Mariners can view the latest port updates on the Coast Guard’s Homeport site.

If and when port condition Yankee is set, meaning sustained Tropical Storm Force winds are expected within 24 hours, vessel movement shall be restricted, and all movement must be approved by the caption of the port.

The Coast Guard is warning the public of these important safety messages:

Stay off the water. The Coast Guard’s search and rescue capabilities degrade as storm conditions strengthen.  This means help could be delayed. Boaters should heed weather watches, warnings and small craft advisories.

Evacuate as necessary. If mandatory evacuations are set for an area, the public should evacuate without delay. Coast Guard personnel and other emergency responders may not be able to evacuate or rescue those in danger during the storm. 

Secure belongings. Owners of large boats are urged to move their vessels to inland marinas where they will be less vulnerable to breaking free of their moorings or to sustaining damage. Trailer-able boats should be pulled from the water and stored in a place that is not prone to flooding. Those who are leaving their boats in the water are reminded to remove EPIRBs and to secure life rings, lifejackets and small boats. These items, if not properly secured, can break free and require valuable search and rescue resources to be diverted to ensure people are not in distress.

Stay clear of beaches. Wave heights and currents typically increase before a storm makes landfall. Even the best swimmers can fall victim to the strong waves and rip currents caused by hurricanes. Swimmers should stay clear of beaches until local lifeguards and law enforcement officials say the water is safe.

Be prepared. Area residents should be prepared by developing a family plan, creating a disaster supply kit, having a place to go, securing their home and having a plan for pets. Information can be found at the National Hurricane Center’s webpage.

Stay informed. The public should monitor the progress and strength of the storm through local television, radio and Internet. Boaters can monitor its progress on VHF radio channel 16. Information can also be obtained on small craft advisories and warnings on VHF radio channel 16. 

For information on Tropical Storm Ian progress and hurricane preparedness, please visit the National Hurricane Center’s webpage.

-USCG-

Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville sets port condition X-Ray for ports of Jacksonville, Fernandina

Source: United States Coast Guard

News Release  

U.S. Coast Guard 7th District PA Detachment Jacksonville
Contact: Coast Guard PA Detachment Jacksonville
Office: 904-714-7606/7607
After Hours: 786-393-4138
PA Detachment Jacksonville online newsroom

Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville sets port condition X-Ray for ports of Jacksonville, Fernandina

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — The Coast Guard Captain of the Port for Jacksonville (COTP) set Port Condition X-Ray for the Port of Jacksonville, Fernandina, and all other Northeast Florida terminals and facilities due to forecasted sustained Tropical Storm Force Winds of 39 mph and gusts up to 73 mph generated by Hurricane Ian that may arrive within 48 hours.

These ports and facilities are currently open to all commercial traffic, and all transfer operations may continue while the X-Ray remains in effect. 

Sustained winds between 39 and 54 mph are possible within 48 hours. Mariners are reminded there are no safe havens in these facilities, and ports are safest when the inventory of vessels is at a minimum. All ocean-going commercial vessels and ocean-going barges greater than 500 gross tonnage should make plans for departing the port.

Vessels desiring to remain in port must immediately contact the COTP to receive permission and are required to submit a safe mooring plan in writing. Vessels bound for the Port of Jacksonville and Fernandina are unable to depart 24 hours prior to threatening winds making landfall are advised to seek an alternate destination.

Pleasure crafts are advised to seek safe harbor. Drawbridges may not be operating if sustained winds reach 25 mph or when an evacuation is in progress. Port facilities are advised to review their heavy weather plans and take all necessary precautions to adequately prepare for the expected conditions. Mariners can view the latest port updates on the Coast Guard’s Homeport site.

If and when Port Condition Yankee is set, meaning sustained Tropical Storm Force winds are expected within 24 hours, vessel movement shall be restricted, and all movement must be approved by the caption of the port.

The Coast Guard is warning the public of these important safety messages:

Stay off the water. The Coast Guard’s search and rescue capabilities degrade as storm conditions strengthen.  This means help could be delayed. Boaters should heed weather watches, warnings and small craft advisories.

Evacuate as necessary. If mandatory evacuations are set for an area, the public should evacuate without delay. Coast Guard personnel and other emergency responders may not be able to evacuate or rescue those in danger during the storm. 

Secure belongings. Owners of large boats are urged to move their vessels to inland marinas where they will be less vulnerable to breaking free of their moorings or to sustaining damage. Trailer-able boats should be pulled from the water and stored in a place that is not prone to flooding. Those who are leaving their boats in the water are reminded to remove EPIRBs and to secure life rings, lifejackets and small boats. These items, if not properly secured, can break free and require valuable search and rescue resources to be diverted to ensure people are not in distress.

Stay clear of beaches. Wave heights and currents typically increase before a storm makes landfall. Even the best swimmers can fall victim to the strong waves and rip currents caused by hurricanes. Swimmers should stay clear of beaches until local lifeguards and law enforcement officials say the water is safe.

Be prepared. Area residents should be prepared by developing a family plan, creating a disaster supply kit, having a place to go, securing their home and having a plan for pets. Information can be found at the National Hurricane Center’s webpage.

Stay informed. The public should monitor the progress and strength of the storm through local television, radio and Internet. Boaters can monitor its progress on VHF radio channel 16. Information can also be obtained on small craft advisories and warnings on VHF radio channel 16. 

For information on Tropical Storm Ian progress and hurricane preparedness, please visit the National Hurricane Center’s webpage.

For more breaking news follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

-USCG-

NATO Deputy Secretary General at the Helsinki Security Forum

Source: NATO

On Friday, 30 September 2022, the NATO Deputy Secretary General, Mr. Mircea Geoană will deliver a keynote speech and take part in a panel on Major war returns to Europe at the Helsinki Security Forum.

Media advisory

15:30 (CEST)            Speech by the NATO Deputy Secretary General

Media coverage

Contact points

For more information, please contact:
Tel: +32 (0)2 707 50 41
press[at]hq.nato.int

Follow us on Twitter (@NATO@Mircea_Geoana and @NATOPress).

USCGC Tahoma returns to new homeport after 66-day patrol

Source: United States Coast Guard

News Release  

U.S. Coast Guard Atlantic Area
Contact: Coast Guard Atlantic Area Public Affairs
Office: 757-398-6608
After Hours: 757-374-7991
Atlantic Area online newsroom

USCGC Tahoma returns to new homeport after 66-day patrol

Editors’ Note: To view more or download high-resolution imagery, click on the photo above.

Newport, R.I. — The crew of the USCGC Tahoma (WMEC 908) returned to their new homeport Sept. 19, 2022 after a 66-day patrol in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea. 

During the patrol, Tahoma conducted living marine resource enforcement, search and rescue, and migrant interdiction operations.

Tahoma departed its previous homeport at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, Maine, for the final time in July, conducting a fisheries enforcement patrol to support the sustainability of economically important fisheries and ensure the safety of the U.S. commercial fishing fleet. Over a 32-day period, Tahoma’s crew conducted 55 commercial fishing vessel boardings, identifying 34 safety violations and four violations of fisheries law.

In August, Tahoma shifted patrol efforts to the Caribbean Sea, in response to a rise in maritime migration from Cuba, to detect, deter and intercept unsafe and illegal ventures to the United States. Tahoma intercepted and cared for 350 migrants across 27 separate cases.

“I am very proud of Tahoma’s crew for their efforts over the past two months.  The crew’s ability to transition between two very different missions is a testament to their dedication, perseverance, and devotion to duty. I am proud of the significant impact this crew made on the safety and sustainability of the North Atlantic commercial fishing industry as well as their efforts in responding to the current increase in maritime migration from Cuba,” said Cmdr. Piero Pecora, commanding officer of Tahoma.

Tahoma is a 270-foot medium endurance cutter homeported in Newport with 100 crewmembers. The cutter’s primary missions are counter drug operations, migrant interdiction, enforcing federal fishery laws and search and rescue in support of Coast Guard operations throughout the Western Hemisphere.

For information on how to join the U.S. Coast Guard, visit www.GoCoastGuard.com to learn more about active duty and reserve officer and enlisted opportunities. Information on how to apply the U.S. Coast Guard Academy can be found at www.uscga.edu.

For more information follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

-USCG-

‘Accelerate Change or Lose’: Robins AFB members modernize aircraft GPS

Source: United States Air Force

The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center at Robins Air Force Base is working on the next generation aircraft navigation system.

The Resilient Embedded Global Positioning System/Inertial Navigation System program, or R-EGI for short, is one of the AFLCMC’s solutions to building resiliency into aircraft navigation systems.

“We are modernizing GPS navigation systems,” said Jamey Sillence, Electronic Warfare and Avionics deputy senior materiel leader. “In the spirit of (Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. CQ Brown, Jr.’s) ‘Accelerate, Change or Lose’, we are bringing modernization to Robins AFB and the whole Air Force.”

The evolution of electronic warfare is in the works via a prototype that can be used on weapons systems – like the F-15 EX, F-16 Fighting Falcon and MC-130J Commando II — offering an alternative precision, navigation and timing capabilities when GPS is not available.

“Our mission is to make sure the United States military and those of our allies can navigate anywhere around the globe whenever they need to,” said Lt. Col. Robinson Hughes, AFLCMC Position, Navigation Timing Office materiel leader. “We all are reliant on U.S. GPS, and adversaries are developing capabilities with the potential to disrupt our way of life. Plus, there are natural events that can disrupt satellites. What happens if we don’t have access to GPS?

“Civil governments around the world are exploring solutions to introduce resilience into their infrastructures and minimize the impact of this situation.  R-EGI is the solution for our military aviation fleet,” Hughes said.

The R/EGI Navigation System prototype is still in development and is scheduled to enter the flight-testing phase in 2024.

“My team keeps U.S. military PNT receivers operating for our customers. We are now developing the next generation of user equipment,” Hughes continued. “The system going forward will have an incredible amount of agility built into it where we can improve capability much more quickly than today.”

Maintaining an edge over adversaries is the goal and the Department of Defense is developing alternative PNT capabilities as back up options.

“By branching out to other sources of PNT, like using other global navigation systems and nontraditional sources like celestial navigation, we increase the probability that our aircraft can navigate anywhere they really need to be,” Hughes said. “There is no doubt the AFLCMC PNT Office is taking General Brown’s action order seriously. They are leading the way to accelerate changes and defining the future of PNT systems.”